Housing and homelessness

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Previously published in the Winnipeg Free Press April 27, 2022  
Authored by a team of researchers out of Dalhouise University, Univeristy of Toronto and Cape Breton University, this report summarizes a study exploring the homeless sector in Nova Scotia during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Halifax, NS – Today, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia released the report,Homelessness during a pandemic: Learning lessons for disaster preparedness in Nova Scotia.
Authored by a team of researchers out of Dalhouise University, Univeristy of Toronto and Cape Breton University, this video summarizes a study exploring the homeless sector in Nova Scotia titled, "Homelessness during a pandemic: Learning lessons for disaster preparedness in Nova Scotia."
With the 2022 municipal elections now in sight—and a housing affordability crisis that’s as bad as ever—the City of Vancouver has embarked on two new directions for more dense housing in its detached-housing neighbourhoods. These moves are modest but point to the type of new housing supply needed region-wide. 
The clamour around the future of Portage Place has quieted down to a chirp, for the moment, closer to the timbre of the sparrows that live in the mall than to the bluster of Bay Street billionaires. The stage is now set for a more modest yet in many ways profoundly more ambitious vision for the neighbourhood mall than the one formerly proposed by Toronto mega-developer Starlight Acquisitions.
It’s time to build the housing we need for the future of Metro Vancouver.  To address the twin crises of housing affordability and climate change, the region specifically needs more “missing middle” housing between the extremes of detached (“single-family”) homes and large condo towers. An aggressive build-out of affordable housing region-wide is central to creating a more fair and vibrant economy that also rises to the challenge of the climate emergency. 
VANCOUVER — Metro Vancouver needs more housing—specifically “missing middle” housing between the extremes of detached homes and large condo towers—to address twin crises of housing affordability and climate change, says a report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office.
Previously published by the Winnipeg Free Press January 25, 2022  
This is The summary report of a research project that began in 2015, the primary intention of which was to chart the housing trajectories of former refugees over the course of approximately three years. In this project, we sought to learn about both the challenges and successes that former or resettling refugees (terms that are described below) had in obtaining adequate and affordable housing after arriving in Winnipeg.

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