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Honourable John Horgan, BC Premier, andHonourable Michelle Mungall, BC Minister for Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resourcescc Andrew Weaver, BC Green Party Leader Dear Premier Horgan and Minister Mungall,
According to the Low-Income Cut Off-After Tax (LICO-AT) measure, there were 105,000 Manitobans (approximately 8.9%) living in poverty in 2011. As a percentage, the number of Manitobans living in poverty hasgone down since the 1990s when it averaged 15%.  However, the depth of poverty in Manitoba has not changed and remains, on average, between 25–35% below the poverty line. The average length of time that people are in low income ranges between 2.5 – 2.7 years although some are in poverty for much longer....  Read Andrew Clarks report for the full story!
This report card reviews the federal government's progress in 16 key policy areas at the halfway mark of their term. It finds that, despite some positive first steps, the Liberals’ ambitious talk hasn’t been backed up with the action needed to make these promises a reality. With two years left in the term, the report card includes suggested next steps to help the Liberal government fulfill the progressive agenda they committed to leading up to the election. Among the recommendations:
Download Senator Sinclair's slide presentation here.
Income security programs in Manitoba and Canada are not keeping pace with the growing problem of poverty. Change is needed to ensure low income and vulnerable people and families do not become entrapped in a lifetime of poverty.
As the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) continues, a new study looks at the problems of reactive government policy on MMIWG in Manitoba.  
Few environmental messes inherited by the new B.C. government rival the unregulated free-for-all that has unfolded in the province’s northeast where companies that frack for natural gas have built nearly 60 unlicensed dams. Not only do some of those dams show distressing signs of failing, but the companies that built them - and the government agencies that regulate them - consistently failed to honestly consult with First Nations about their intentions.
Government-issued identification (ID) is essential to gain access to a wide range of government entitlements, commercial services and financial systems. Lack of ID on the other hand, represents a critical barrier that prevents low-income Manitobans from accessing these services and benefits, and ultimately results in further marginalization and deepening poverty. A new study, Access to Identification for Low-Income Manitobans researches what can be done to address these challenges.
Resource Policy Analyst Ben Parfitt sent this letter to BC’s Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) in response to Progress Energy’s extraordinary request to retroactively exempt the Lily and Town dams from environmental reviews. Such reviews should have been conducted before the dams were built. Not only did those reviews not happen, but the company also failed to obtain other authorizations that it should have well before the dams were built. The Town dam was built in 2012. The Lily dam in 2014.

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