Aboriginal issues

Subscribe to Aboriginal issues
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press, Thursday June 8th. On Friday May 26, I attended an impromptu event organized by supporters of the North Point Douglas Women’s Centre.  The event was held to show support for the Centre, which was reeling from the news that it would not receive an expected $120,000 required for its operations.  This represents one third of the Centre’s budget and losing it means that North Point Douglas Women’s Centre will be forced to cut important programs that are serving the community well. It got me thinking about reconciliation.
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press June 15, 2017 Inter-Agency effort to support inner-city women's centre
There is an important difference between celebration and commemoration. In considering Canada 150, the government tagline for this year’s sesquicentennial festivities, the contributors to this special issue of the Monitor argue too little of what we are seeing can, or is even intended to, lead the country to a fuller understanding of its history. To truly commemorate—whether it is Canada’s Confederation or any other moment—we need to address those things we find distasteful and disappointing, as well as those things that make us proud.
“Bloodvein 3” (2008) by Anishinabe artist Scott Benesiinaabandan. The trope of the vanishing Indian has been around since Europeans realized Indians existed. In the colonial imagination, then, we began to disappear at the exact moment we were first seen.
Have Indigenous people in Canada been active as wage labourers and union members? If so, what have been the circumstances? When and where and for what reasons have Indigenous people worked for wages and been union mem­bers and how have they fared in these roles? In this short paper we examine a wide range of re­cent studies that have looked at various aspects of these questions.
Several small non-profit organizations (NPOs) are nervously awaiting Manitoba’s 2017 budget. Funding sources they’ve come to rely on have been ‘on pause’ for months and its beginning to affect the services they provide.  Many organizations have been unable to confirm that multi-year agreements signed through the government’s Non-Profit Organization (NPO) Strategy will remain in place—they are told they must wait until the budget is released.
This winter, a 53 year-old woman died overnight in minus 32-degree temperatures, frozen to death on the streets of downtown Winnipeg. This tragic and preventable loss serves as a reminder of how Winnipeg is failing to support people who need it the most and that the homelessness crisis affects women. A new study released today renews calls to action to deal with this tremendously unjust situation.
This winter, a 53 year-old woman died overnight in minus 32-degree temperatures, frozen to death on the streets of downtown Winnipeg. This tragic and preventable loss serves as a reminder of how Winnipeg is failing to support people who need it the most and that the homelessness crisis affects women. This study renews calls to action to deal with this tremendously unjust situation—so that we need not have even another year of women’s homelessness in Winnipeg and Manitoba.
Looking for BC Update and BC Commentary? Look no further. We’ve combined the two to create BC Solutions. Through this new publication, we’re pleased to be better able to keep you up-to-date on research, events and other goings-on at the CCPA–BC Office. In this issue:
This year’s State of the Inner City Report tackles arguably the most important issue of our time: healing and reconciling Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples. A year and a half after the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) 94 Calls to Action were released, this research documents community-based efforts in inner city Winnipeg to implement these recommendations and more broadly break cycles of racism and colonization.

Pages