Corporations and corporate power

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Canada is only months away from legalizing and regulating the production, sale and use of cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes. Yet, as we explore in our cover story this issue, the plan is rife with contradictions: a fledgling industry populated by former police chiefs; the fact bills C-45 and C-46 will create dozens of new pot-related offences in the process of removing some of the old ones; the continued prohibition on growing more than four or five plants at home while Canada's "licensed producers" are expected to make billions.
Despite being better educated than previous generations, there are fewer decent jobs for younger workers, even after they have paid their dues working entry-level jobs or unpaid internships. They’re taking on considerable student debt only to find a fractured labour market that denies them access to full-time jobs with decent pay and benefits. And it doesn’t seem to matter which sector of the labour market they turn to.
It’s hardly surprising, given the size and market power of today’s internet giants, that questions about their impacts on public life and governance are rising fast and furious. What is surprising, however, is how consistently we refuse or neglect to acknowledge one of the central pillars of these entities’ private success: the public sector itself, in the form of public services, government support and a mass citizen consumer base.
  Photo by Memphis CVB (Flickr Creative Commons)
Illustration by Katie Raso
Illustration by Kara Sievewright   Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.
Carillion, a major global player in the promo­tion of Public-Private Partnerships (P3s) has gone into liquidation in the UK. The collapse of this massive company is a case study of all that is wrong with P3s as an approach to building and operating public infrastructure. Carillion sponsored and financed over 60 P3s but more importantly provided the facility management services for them once construction was com­pleted. It was the second largest builder in the UK. It also held many government outsourcing contracts and undertook project financing as well as construction. 
In this issue: Fossil fuel industry accustomed to guarding the hen house, documents reveal Call for public inquiry into fracking Rosenbluth lecture: Inclusive growth and the future of work BC First Nations and renewable energy BC Budget 2018 recommendations Adult basic education 20th anniversary retrospectives Submissions to the new BC government from the CCPA–BC Photos from the 2017 Gala 2017 Power of Youth Awards A crucial time of year for us
The eleventh in an annual series, this year's report on CEO compensation finds that, for the first time, Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs netted 209 times more than the average worker made in 2016. Canadian CEOs are again taking home pre-2008-crisis levels of compensation, pushing the income gap between Canada’s top executives and the average worker to record highs.