Economy and economic indicators

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This paper examines 15 years of income inequality for families raising children in Ontario (2000 to 2015), comparing it with national data for context, and finds several disturbing trends.
TORONTO – Ontario is becoming more polarized as the bottom half of Ontario families see their share of the income pie shrinking while the top half takes home even more, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The bottom half of families raising children in Ontario saw its share of earnings fall to 19 per cent of total labour market income between 2000 and 2015—down three percentage points—while the top half of families increased its share of the income pie by three percentage points, earning 81 per cent of the total income pie.
Photo by r2hox (Flickr creative commons)
This expanded version of the Monitor summer reading guide takes a break from frenetic social media feeds to assess the fluctuating political and economic reality from a place of relative stability: books. Rather than just telling us what they will be reading this summer, contributors ground longer arguments about the state of the world in recent Canadian and international non-fiction releases with a connection to the CCPA’s underlying mandate: to promote social, economic and environmental justice.
This report finds that for the first time ever, Canada’s private sector is racking up debt faster than any other of the world’s 22 advanced economies, putting the country at risk of serious economic consequences. The report reveals that Canada added $1 trillion in private sector debt over the past five years (in 2016 dollars), with the corporate sector responsible for the majority of it.
For the first time ever, Canada’s private sector is racking up debt faster than any other of the world’s 22 advanced economies, putting the country at risk of serious economic consequences, according to new research by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. A new report authored by CCPA Senior Economist David Macdonald reveals that Canada added $1 trillion in private sector debt over the past five years ($2016), with the corporate sector responsible for the majority of it.
Halifax—With the looming federal government deadline for provinces to institute their own carbon pricing scheme or have it imposed, the next Nova Scotia government will have a small window to move forward. Today, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia released a backgrounder that outlines a progressive policy on carbon pricing that it urges should be adopted instead of the one being currently proposed.  
With the looming federal government deadline for provinces to institute their own carbon pricing scheme or have it imposed, the next Nova Scotia government will have a small window to move forward. This backgrounder urges the next provincial government to prioritize the transition to a greener economy and outlines a progressive policy on carbon pricing that should be adopted instead of the one being currently proposed.
Today, 11 communities across BC released their local living wage rates. A living wage is the hourly amount that two working parents with two young children must earn to meet their basic expenses.
For those seeking to calculate the living wage in other BC and Canadian communities, you can download the living wage calculation guide and spreadsheet (below). And please let the Living Wage Campaign know what you come up with — they're working on keeping track of amounts across the province and across Canada: info@livingwageforfamilies.ca. You can also contact the campaign if you want to become a living wage employer or to participate in the work of the campaign.

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