Economy and economic indicators

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This submission to the BC Budget Consultations for 2018 includes: 
(Vancouver) The Site C dam is not necessary, and moving forward to completion is likely to have adverse impacts on BC Hydro and ratepayers of all classes. That is the conclusion of a submission to the BC Utilities Commission’s (BCUC) consultations on the proposed Site C Dam, authored by Senior Economist Marc Lee from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – BC Office (CCPA-BC).
This brief focuses on the economic questions about Site C posed by the BC government to the BCUC. Informed by the economics of energy transition, it examines the links between the proposed Site C dam and fossil fuel extraction, and raises questions about the need for the electricity Site C would produce.
If all goes according to plan, by July 2018 several provinces and territories will have a new securities regulator. Currently, each province and territory operates its own regulator that is responsible for administrating each province’s unique laws. The provincial and territorial regulators are part of an umbrella organization, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA).
The Trudeau government has shone internationally on a progressive message of tolerance, openness, diversity and inclusive, sustainable economic growth. It says it wants to make globalization fair for everyone, and that, as the prime minister tweeted, Canada welcomes all people “fleeing persecution, terror & war.” But on a number of files the government has bent itself into a pretzel trying to square its beliefs with its actions. An underlying theme throughout this issue of the Monitor is the empty gesture.
This paper examines 15 years of income inequality for families raising children in Ontario (2000 to 2015), comparing it with national data for context, and finds several disturbing trends.
TORONTO – Ontario is becoming more polarized as the bottom half of Ontario families see their share of the income pie shrinking while the top half takes home even more, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The bottom half of families raising children in Ontario saw its share of earnings fall to 19 per cent of total labour market income between 2000 and 2015—down three percentage points—while the top half of families increased its share of the income pie by three percentage points, earning 81 per cent of the total income pie.
Photo by r2hox (Flickr creative commons)
This expanded version of the Monitor summer reading guide takes a break from frenetic social media feeds to assess the fluctuating political and economic reality from a place of relative stability: books. Rather than just telling us what they will be reading this summer, contributors ground longer arguments about the state of the world in recent Canadian and international non-fiction releases with a connection to the CCPA’s underlying mandate: to promote social, economic and environmental justice.

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