Environment and sustainability

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In this issue: BC’s new (affordable?) housing policies A bleak jobs picture outside BC’s big cities The great log export drain The biggest source of waste in Canadian health care? The private, for-profit sector. BC’s Jobs Plan doesn’t equal a comprehensive poverty reduction plan Joining our CCPA–BC community
Screenshot from the July/August 2009 issue of Upstream Dialogue, a newsletter from the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.
PHOTO CREDIT: kris krüg
This issue of the Monitor features a number of articles and new research coming out of the Corporate Mapping Project, an exciting joint initiative of the University of Victoria, the CCPA’s B.C. and Saskatchewan offices, and the Parkland Institute in Alberta that is making the links between the oil sector and political power in Canada. “People yearn for alternatives to business as usual,” write project co-directors Shannon Daub and Bill Carroll in their introductory article.
With the BC government’s promise of tens of thousands of jobs in a new liquefied natural gas industry in tatters, the province’s long-neglected forest industry has the potential to help close the widening employment gap between heavily populated areas like the Lower Mainland and the rest of the province.  The provincial government regulates this industry, but for the past four years it has offered no substantive policies to stimulate job growth in the sector that has historically been the economic backbone of many rural BC communities. 
This short two-part report shows that between 2013 and 2016, more raw logs were shipped from BC than during any other four-year period in the province’s history. If these logs had been processed in some of BC’s hardest hit forestry communities, at least 3,600 new jobs could have been generated. This has prompted two forest industry unions and three leading environmental groups to call for a ban on raw log exports from old-growth forests and bold government action to stimulate BC’s flagging forest sector. 
(Vancouver) Between 2013 and 2016, more raw logs were shipped from BC than during any other four-year period in the province’s history, prompting two forest industry unions and three leading environmental groups to call for a ban on raw log exports from old-growth forests and bold government action to stimulate BC’s flagging forest sector. 
How is climate change and sustainability being taught, practiced and promoted in educational institutions across the country? To help answer that question, this issue of Our Schools/Our Selves profiles some of the work of the Sustainability Education Research Institute (SERI) at the University of Saskatchewan, and its flagship program, the Sustainability and Education Policy Network (sepn.ca). This collection is sure to be invaluable to educators and students keen to address this topic as workers, as students, as unionists, as activists, and as community members.
This study re-examines Canada’s contribution to global climate change in light of the Paris Agreement by looking at extracted carbon—the total amount of fossil fuels removed from Canadian soil that ends up in the atmosphere—whether used for domestic purposes or exported and combusted elsewhere.

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