Environment and sustainability

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A subsidiary of Malaysian state-owned Petronas, the company behind a massive Liquefied Natural Gas plant proposal near Prince Rupert, has built at least 16 large unauthorized dams in northeast BC to trap water used for fracking operations, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has learned.
One of the primary rationales for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project (TMEP) is to maximize the price for Alberta bitumen by getting oil from Alberta to “tidewater”. Tidewater refers to ocean access in order to ship oil to overseas markets via tankers. Industry and the federal and Alberta governments argue that a pipeline to tidewater will unlock new markets (Asia in the case of the TMEP) where Canadian oil can command a better price than in the US, where the majority of Canadian oil is currently exported.
(Vancouver) As Kinder Morgan Canada turned to the stock market to finance its Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion (TMEP), a new report by veteran earth scientist David Hughes finds that Alberta oil sold on international markets would likely command a lower price than if sold in North America.  Both the federal and Alberta governments and the oil industry argue that a pipeline to tidewater will unlock new markets (Asia in the case of TMEP) where Canadian oil can command a better price than in the US, where the majority of Canadian oil is currently exported.
This report finds that Canadian climate change policy remains underdeveloped and plagued by a wide “ambition gap” between government promises and policy action. The report breaks down the success and shortcomings of current Canadian climate policy at the federal and provincial levels, and makes recommendations that would set the country on a path toward an inclusive and productive low-carbon economy.
OTTAWA—Climate change policy in Canada remains underdeveloped and plagued by a wide “ambition gap” between government promises and policy action, according to a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The study, by CCPA researcher Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood, breaks down climate policy success and shortcomings federally and provincially through early 2017.
Halifax—With the looming federal government deadline for provinces to institute their own carbon pricing scheme or have it imposed, the next Nova Scotia government will have a small window to move forward. Today, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia released a backgrounder that outlines a progressive policy on carbon pricing that it urges should be adopted instead of the one being currently proposed.  
With the looming federal government deadline for provinces to institute their own carbon pricing scheme or have it imposed, the next Nova Scotia government will have a small window to move forward. This backgrounder urges the next provincial government to prioritize the transition to a greener economy and outlines a progressive policy on carbon pricing that should be adopted instead of the one being currently proposed.
VANCOUVER – A subsidiary of Malaysian state-owned Petronas, the company behind a massive Liquefied Natural Gas plant proposal near Prince Rupert, has built at least 16 large unauthorized dams in northeast BC to trap water used for fracking operations, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has learned. 
Disappointingly, specifics were lacking from the provincial budget on fight against climate change. In what was arguably the first real budget to be presented by Brian Pallister’s Progressive Conservative government, they had precious little to say about how they intend to protect the environment and move our province away from the use of fossil fuels.
In this issue: BC’s new (affordable?) housing policies A bleak jobs picture outside BC’s big cities The great log export drain The biggest source of waste in Canadian health care? The private, for-profit sector. BC’s Jobs Plan doesn’t equal a comprehensive poverty reduction plan Joining our CCPA–BC community

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