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This submission to the BC Budget Consultations for 2018 includes: 
(VICTORIA) BC’s new government has made a strong start in addressing crucial issues for British Columbians in its first budget update, which is a welcome change in direction from the last 16 years, says the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office.
Previously published in the Winnipeg Free Press August 9, 2017 Last week I was chatting with my uncle, a retiree on a fixed income, about the health service cuts at the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. He said “if the deficit is $83 million, why doesn’t everyone just paid a bit more in taxes and then cuts would not be required?” With consideration for one’s ability to pay, why not indeed?
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press Friday July 14th, 2017  
Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) are a relatively new way of financing social services in Canada. They differ from the normal way of financing social services in that they are funded initially by pri­vate sector businesses or foundations, which are reimbursed by governments after 3 to 7 years only if certain agreed upon performance measures are met.
Despite pundits’ claims that “its not as bad as it could be” there are a myriad of program cuts and tax cuts in this budget. As the weeks go by more impacts will invariably be felt in our community. Yet poverty and social inequality continue to grow and the climate crisis looms.  Every year without investment in these critical areas is huge loss to all Manitobans.  
Changes to Manitoba’s Health Care system are coming fast and furious. This will invariably impact key services we all rely on and limit access to needed services.
The government was well aware that many were dreading Budget 2017.  Non-profit organizations, healthcare workers, educators and public sector workers in general were bracing for Filmon flashbacks. Did the Conservative team take those fears into consideration when putting together the budget?
On April 11, the Progressive Conservative government led by Brian Pallister released its second budget under their mandate. While the government is calling it moderate, post-secondary students are calling it an attack on accessible, affordable and high quality public post-secondary education. With student debt closing in on $20,000, the ability for students to pay down their debt just got harder with the release of the 2017 Manitoba budget. Let’s talk about why.

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