Seniors issues and pensions

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OTTAWA—After more than 200 sitting days in Parliament, the federal government has not lived up to the vast majority of its progressive promises, according to new analysis released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
"Our research indicates that strategies intended to support choices for long-term care residents must be based on the understanding that care is a relationship involving residents, their families and workers. It also means understanding that appropriate conditions of work are central to care as a relationship that allows residents and their families to exercise choices.
In a new Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives MB report on Manitoba’s public-sector pensions Pensions in Manitoba: What’s Working, What’s Not, What's a Solution and What's Not, author Hugh Mackenzie dispels many myths about public and private sector pensions.
In a new Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives MB report on Manitoba’s public-sector pensions, author Hugh Mackenzie dispels many myths about public and private sector pensions. He anchors his analysis in the context of Canada’s retirement income policy and its three main players:  Old Age Security (OAS) and the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS); the Canadian Pension Plan (CPP); and, workplace based pension plans.
If all goes according to plan, by July 2018 several provinces and territories will have a new securities regulator. Currently, each province and territory operates its own regulator that is responsible for administrating each province’s unique laws. The provincial and territorial regulators are part of an umbrella organization, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA).
As recently as 40 years ago, old age meant living in poverty for more than a third of Canadian seniors. Thankfully, public programs like the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement changed this, cutting BC’s seniors’ poverty rate to a low of 2.2% in the mid-1990s, among the lowest in the western world.
BC seniors are anything but a homogenous group. Large income and wealth inequalities exist among both seniors and working-age British Columbians—the defining problem we face isn’t about intergenerational inequality, but rather the growing gap between rich and poor across generations. This study uses Statistics Canada data to study the economic well-being of BC seniors, and takes a close look at indicators of economic insecurity including core housing need, the costs and accessibility of essential care and prescription medications, and food insecurity. —
Our photo essay, Economic insecurity touches seniors’ lives in profound ways (published alongside the study, Poverty and Inequality Among British Columbia’s Seniors) describes the lived experiences of three senior women living in economic insecurity in BC.
BC seniors are anything but a homogenous group. Large income and wealth inequalities exist among both seniors and working-age British Columbians—the defining problem we face isn’t about intergenerational inequality, but rather the growing gap between rich and poor across generations. Learn more: policyalternatives.ca/SeniorsInequality