Public services and privatization

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Ce rapport examine l’état des finances des provinces canadiennes et constate que, malgré les effets dévastateurs de l’épidémie de COVID-19 sur le Canada, les déficits des provinces sont en passe de disparaître beaucoup plus rapidement que prévu initialement. En fait, la majorité des provinces sont déjà en excédent budgétaire ou le deviendront au cours du prochain exercice, à mesure que l’économie se redressera.
As Canada reaches two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, provincial deficits are on track to disappear much faster than initially predicted.  Disappearing Act: The state of provincial deficits in Canada, examines the state of provincial finances and finds that major positive revisions of revenue projections mean fiscal surpluses have either already arrived or will soon.
OTTAWA—Provincial deficits are on track to disappear much faster than initially predicted despite unprecedented spending to fight COVID-19, according to a new report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). 
In the two years since Canada’s pandemic experience began, transit ridership across the country has plummeted. Or perhaps, more accurately, riders who had the ability to work remotely or the ability to find alternate transportation to work did so. Early in the pandemic, ridership in Toronto, for example, declined as much as 85% resulting in a $21 million per week revenue loss for the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). In turn, the TTC laid off 450 employees and reduced service.
For governments that seek to defend the public-private partnership (P3) model and their continued use of it, the “value for money” (VfM) report is often the primary means by which governments seek to lessen public skepticism and justify their decision in opting for a P3. 
REGINA - For governments that seek to defend the public-private partnership (P3) model and their continued use of it, the “value for money” (VfM) report is often the primary means by which governments seek to lessen public skepticism and justify their decision in opting for a P3.
The report tracks which level of government picked up the tab for any COVID-19 program announced in each government’s 2021 spring budget, and also analyzes how the provinces are spending their share of federal transfers. Compared to the beginning of this year, provincial governments have kicked in more money to combat the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and are sitting on less unspent federal money.
OTTAWA—Compared to the beginning of this year, provincial governments have kicked in more money to combat the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and are sitting on less unspent federal money, according to a new study from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press, Tuesday August 24, 2021  

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