Taxes and tax cuts

Subscribe to Taxes and tax cuts
This submission to the BC Budget Consultations for 2018 includes: 
New research finds that the benefits of small business income splitting, also known as income sprinkling, are concentrated amongst Canada’s richest and that the loophole is not used by the vast majority of families declaring small business income. For more information on who benefits from income sprinkling, read the full report: Splitting the Difference.
This report finds that the benefits of small business income splitting, also known as income sprinkling, are concentrated amongst Canada’s richest and that the loophole is not used by the vast majority of families declaring small business income. In fact, the report estimates that only 5 per cent of families receiving small business dividends are actively using income splitting.
OTTAWA— The benefits of small-business income splitting, also known as income sprinkling, are concentrated amongst Canada’s richest and not used by the vast majority of families declaring small business income, according to new myth-busting research from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
(VICTORIA) BC’s new government has made a strong start in addressing crucial issues for British Columbians in its first budget update, which is a welcome change in direction from the last 16 years, says the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office.
OTTAWA – Selon un nouveau rapport du Centre canadien de politiques alternatives (CCPA), les traitements fiscaux préférentiels tels les exemptions, les crédits et les échappatoires sont devenus de véritables mannes pour la tranche de 10 pour cent des contribuables canadiens les plus fortunés.
OTTAWA – Preferential tax treatments such as tax exemptions, credits, and loopholes have become a cash cow for Canada’s richest 10 per cent, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report analyzes Canada’s 10 costliest preferential tax treatments, starting with the richest 10 per cent, which is responsible for 42 per cent of the federal money spent on these types of tax expenditures (up from 36 per cent in 1992).
Preferential tax treatments such as tax exemptions, credits, and loopholes have become a cash cow for Canada’s rich. This report analyzes the country’s 10 costliest preferential tax treatments, starting with the richest 10% of Canadians, which is responsible for 42 per cent of the federal money spent on these types of tax expenditures (up from 36% in 1992).

Pages