Women's equality

Subscribe to Women's equality
Full audio Slides Download the slides (PDF) Event photos
Canada has a gender gap. When it comes to pay, jobs, and safety, men and women still don't get equal treatment in this country.
This annual study provides a snapshot of the gaps in men and women’s access to economic security, personal security, education, health, and positions of leadership in Canada’s largest 25 metropolitan areas. It measures these gaps in a given community in order to capture inequalities that can be attributed, at least in part, to discrimination based on gender; it also serves as a reminder that, with the right choices and policies, these gaps can be closed.
OTTAWA—A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) updates the list of the best and worst cities to be a woman in Canada. Victoria comes out on top for the second year in a row while big gaps in employment and high poverty rates for women put Windsor in last place.
First published on CCPA's Behind the Numbers
Recently tipping in the restaurant industry has been the subject of two national opinion polls, both of which suggest the public is divided on the ingrained social practice that is tipping. 
ST.JOHN’S – The Newfoundland and Labrador budget will worsen gender inequalities in the province, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The study reviews the impacts of the 2016-17 budget on girls and women in Newfoundland and Labrador and finds it will decrease the income of the most vulnerable women, public service lay-offs will lead to greater unemployment for women, and cuts to education will negatively impact girls.
This study finds that the 2016-17 Newfoundland and Labrador budget will worsen gender inequalities in the province. The study reviews the impacts of the budget on girls and women in Newfoundland and Labrador, and finds that it will decrease the income of the most vulnerable women, that public service lay-offs will lead to greater unemployment for women, and that cuts to education will negatively impact girls. The author also makes several recommendations for the provincial government to improve its consultation process
This study makes a new contribution to the understanding of Ontario’s gender pay gap by drawing upon a decile analysis to understand the distribution of men’s and women’s earnings. The analysis reveals that the average pay gap between men and women stands at 29.4 per cent in Ontario — a gap that shadows women every step of the way up the income ladder.
TORONTO – The average pay gap between men and women stands at 29.4 per cent in Ontario — a gap that shadows women every step of the way up the income ladder, says a new study from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Ontario office (CCPA-Ontario).  Every Step You Take: Ontario’s Gender Pay Gap Ladder, released in time for the Ontario government recognized Equal Pay Day on April 19, 2016, shows Ontario’s pay gap widens and persists throughout the income distribution.

Pages