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Previously published in the Winnipeg Free Press May 25, 2021
Previously published in the Winnipeg Free Press on Wednesday May 12, 2021
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press Friday May 7, 2021
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press April 23, 2021 A teacher hands a child his report card in the morning, and intervenes in a child’s bullying in the afternoon --- a few hours later, their parents tell the principal if that teacher’s career should continue.  Bill 64 creates that scenario, in 84 (3)(e) which gives parents on a school community council the power to “make recommendations respecting the need to evaluate the performance of any person employed at the school.”  Anyone have a problem with that situation? 
One of the books I ordered after George Floyd was killed is called ‘Anti-Racist Baby’, by Ibram X. Kendi. It is a list of actions parents can take to teach their kids to be anti-racist. The third point in the book is ‘Point at policies as the problem, not people’. So, here we go. Let’s point at a proposed policy. It’s easy to get lost in all the problematic aspects of Bill 64, especially as a  teacher. It becomes a ‘can’t see the forest for the trees’ situation.
Bill 55, The Reducing Red Tape and Improving Services Act, includes a commitment to eliminating the Adult Literacy Act. I am speaking against the elimination of the Adult Lit-eracy Act. I believe that the government ought to be increasing its commitment to adult literacy, not eliminating the Act.
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press March 26, 2021
VANCOUVER — A one per cent tax on wealth over $20 million would generate nearly twice as much revenue as previously calculated by the Parliamentary Budget Officer, money that could lift thousands of Canadians out of poverty and fund health, social and environmental programs says new research by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, BC Office. 
The provincial government is continuing its education reform agenda in the middle of a global pandemic. The experience of Ontario’s education reforms is a cautionary tale on how public policy can exacerbate inequality in education.

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