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There are unsung heroes in Winnipeg’s inner city, especially in the Aboriginal community, and few of them have a list of accomplishments as long and as significant as does Kathy Mallett. Winnipeg’s inner city today is an exciting place, bursting with positive change. Kathy Mallett has been a key person in laying the foundations for these changes.
« Dans ce livre, Nora Loreto propose une vision rafraichie de l’indispensable mouvement syndical à la jeune génération de Canadiens et Canadiennes que la mondialisation avare et cruelle des entreprises a laissés sans protection. Lisez-le et devenez les maitres de votre avenir en vous engageant avec conviction sur le chemin de la justice pour les travailleurs et travailleuses. » —Ralph Nader
A key outcome of last year’s teachers’ strike was increased understanding of the phrase “class size and composition.” The public came to appreciate that teachers were fighting not just for better wages, but for improved teaching and learning conditions. Striking teachers explained how classroom conditions had deteriorated since the BC government gutted their contract in 2002 — removing the limits on class sizes and the number of special needs students per class, while at the same time cutting funding for special education teachers and assistants.
This study looks at trends in tuition and compulsory fees in Canada since 1993, projects fees for each province for the next four years, and ranks the provinces on affordability for median- and low-income families using a Cost of Learning Index. The study finds that, on average, tuition and compulsory fees for Canadian undergraduate students have tripled between 1993-94 and 2015-16 and will continue to rise over the next four years, from $6,971 this fall to an estimated $7,590 in 2018-19.
OTTAWA—On average, tuition and compulsory fees for Canadian undergraduate students have tripled between 1993-94 and 2015-16 and will continue to rise over the next four years, from $6,971 this fall to an estimated $7,590 in 2018-19, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The study looks at trends in tuition and compulsory fees in Canada since 1993, projects fees for each province for the next four years, and ranks the provinces on affordability for median- and low-income families using a Cost of Learning Index.
This issue of Our Schools / Our Selves takes stock of where we are and where we need to be in the child care debates, in the lead-up to a national election that is very much about how we care for our children and how we support families in that task.
Le présent rapport donne un portrait général des politiques en matière d’enseignement spécial dans l’ensemble du Canada.
This report provides a general picture of special education policies across Canada, and finds that the majority are more than 10 years old and out of step with current practices around inclusive education. The report also provides a detailed overview of inclusive education policy and funding in each province and territory, and makes a number of recommendations to improve special education policy, implementation, and delivery. Ce rapport est disponible en Français.
OTTAWA—The majority of special education policies in place across Canada are more than 10 years old and out of step with current practices around inclusive education, says a report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. The report, by disability rights researcher Helena Towle, provides a general picture of special education policies across Canada, including how inclusive education is defined, the policy in how inclusive education is implemented, and how funding is allocated to students with disabilities.
Jim Stanford’s Economics for Everyone has quickly become a standard reference for economics literacy and popular education. Now published in 6 languages, the book is used in higher education, trade unions, and community education initiatives around the world. This new second edition has been completely revised and updated, with new statistics, cartoons, and anecdotes. The book also includes several all-new chapters – on inequality, on racism and discrimination, and on the lasting consequences of the 2008-09 global financial crisis.