Employment and labour

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In the Fall 2016 Monitor, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives  (CCPA)Saskatewan’s Simon Enoch penned Getting to Know Brad, introducing Canada’s most popular premier – Brad Wall - to the country. He ran down Wall’s list of “accomplishments”. What made Simon’s analysis so interesting (and at the same time, disheartening) was how Wall has rolled out such a regressive agenda while remaining so popular.  He noted that the rest of Canada needed to pay attention to Wall as he was beta-testing a number of conservative policy experiments that we could see replicated elsewhere.
The news that Manitoba Hydro will shed 900 employees hit the community like a tonne of bricks. The new government said cutbacks were coming, but 900 is a staggering number; 15 percent of Hydro’s workforce. Not only is this a tragedy for the workers and their families, it is a real blow to our economy. It is unclear how this will impact hydro services we rely on.
Looking for BC Update and BC Commentary? Look no further. We’ve combined the two to create BC Solutions. Through this new publication, we’re pleased to be better able to keep you up-to-date on research, events and other goings-on at the CCPA–BC Office. In this issue:
Illustration by Alisha Davidson As the Ontario and Quebec governments design their versions of a basic income pilot program, Canadians find themselves engaged in a policy question we haven’t grappled with in almost half a century: how should the welfare state evolve? 
TORONTO – Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs have set a new record: their total compensation in 2015 hit a new high at $9.5 million, on average, according to a new Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) report. The report shows Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs on the TSX index now make 193 times more than someone earning an average wage. “Although public outrage over exorbitantly high CEO pay continues unabated, especially since the Great Recession of 2008-09, CEO pay in Canada takes a licking and keeps on ticking,” says economist Hugh Mackenzie.
By 11:47am today, just before most Canadians are starting their lunch break on the first official work day of the year, Canada’s highest paid CEOs will have already pocketed $49,510. It takes the average worker an entire year, working full-time to make that amount. And not much has changed over the past 10 years. Despite public outrage over exorbitantly high compensation packages, CEO pay has continued unabated, weathering all kinds of economic storms, and soaring to new highs.
The CCPA has been tracking CEO pay in Canada for 10 years, and in that time we've found that little has changed. Despite public outrage over exorbitantly high compensation packages, CEO pay has continued unabated, weathering all kinds of economic storms, and soaring to new highs.
HALIFAX/ANTIGONISH, NS—Two working parents with two children need to each earn a minimum of $19.17 an hour to make ends meet in Halifax, and $17.30 an hour in Antigonish, says a new study released today by the the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Nova Scotia, in partnership with the Antigonish Poverty Reduction Coalition.

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