Employment and labour

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In The Fight for a $15 Minimum Wage in Saskatchewan, University of Regina Business professor Dr. Andrew Stevens explodes many of the more prevalent myths about the minimum wage and minimum wage workers. Dr. Stevens shows that minimum wage workers can no longer be perceived as mostly teenagers working part-time in a small family-run business. Rather, minimum wage earners in the province are older, disproportionately female and many work for large, corporate employers. As Dr.
In this submission to the BC Fair Wages Commission, the CCPA-BC highlights the urgency for British Columbia to adopt a $15 minimum wage by March 2019.  BC’s current minimum wage is a poverty-level wage. Low-wage workers need a significant boost to their income and they have been waiting a long time. Over 400,000 British Columbians—22 per cent of all paid employees in the province—work for less than $15 per hour and they would significantly benefit from a $15 minimum wage.
This report card reviews the federal government's progress in 16 key policy areas at the halfway mark of their term. It finds that, despite some positive first steps, the Liberals’ ambitious talk hasn’t been backed up with the action needed to make these promises a reality. With two years left in the term, the report card includes suggested next steps to help the Liberal government fulfill the progressive agenda they committed to leading up to the election. Among the recommendations:
Illustration by Alisha Davidson
Income security programs in Manitoba and Canada are not keeping pace with the growing problem of poverty. Change is needed to ensure low income and vulnerable people and families do not become entrapped in a lifetime of poverty.
(VICTORIA) BC’s new government has made a strong start in addressing crucial issues for British Columbians in its first budget update, which is a welcome change in direction from the last 16 years, says the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office.
If all goes according to plan, by July 2018 several provinces and territories will have a new securities regulator. Currently, each province and territory operates its own regulator that is responsible for administrating each province’s unique laws. The provincial and territorial regulators are part of an umbrella organization, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA).
Illustration by Amy Thompson
This paper examines 15 years of income inequality for families raising children in Ontario (2000 to 2015), comparing it with national data for context, and finds several disturbing trends.

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