Inequality and poverty

Subscribe to Inequality and poverty
Click to enlarge (files open in a new window). You can also download maps (PDF) via the links below. 
As the BC government prepares to table its budget on February 21 and political parties try to convince British Columbians to vote for them in May, they all need to focus on poverty – specifically, how to reduce it throughout the province.  At 13.2 per cent, BC’s poverty rate is the second highest in the country. Yet we are the only province in Canada without a poverty reduction plan. 
In the Fall 2016 Monitor, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives  (CCPA)Saskatewan’s Simon Enoch penned Getting to Know Brad, introducing Canada’s most popular premier – Brad Wall - to the country. He ran down Wall’s list of “accomplishments”. What made Simon’s analysis so interesting (and at the same time, disheartening) was how Wall has rolled out such a regressive agenda while remaining so popular.  He noted that the rest of Canada needed to pay attention to Wall as he was beta-testing a number of conservative policy experiments that we could see replicated elsewhere.
Last Monday the Manitoba Minister responsible for the status of women, Rochelle Squires declared the third week in January “gender equality week”. However the new provincial government needs to carefully consider what steps are needed to achieve true equality for Manitoba women.  The answer lies in starting with equity, targeted investments and supporting strong public services.
BC is Canada’s only province without a poverty reduction plan. This report examines the most recent statistics on poverty and its associated hardships in BC, and demonstrates that strong policies are urgently needed to dramatically reduce and ultimately eliminate poverty in our province. A comprehensive and ambitious poverty reduction plan for BC is long overdue. 
BC’s poverty rate is virtually unchanged from where it was a decade ago – yet the province remains the only one in Canada without a poverty reduction plan. Learn more about the state of poverty in BC and find recommendations at: policyalternatives.ca/overdue   
(Vancouver) BC’s poverty rate is virtually unchanged from where it was a decade ago yet the province remains the only one in Canada without a poverty reduction plan. And it’s not because BC doesn’t have a poverty problem. At 13.2 per cent, BC’s poverty rate is the second highest in the country says a new report – Long Overdue: Why BC Needs a Poverty Reduction Plan, co-published today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), the United Way of the Lower Mainland and the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition.
Looking for BC Update and BC Commentary? Look no further. We’ve combined the two to create BC Solutions. Through this new publication, we’re pleased to be better able to keep you up-to-date on research, events and other goings-on at the CCPA–BC Office. In this issue:
Illustration by Alisha Davidson As the Ontario and Quebec governments design their versions of a basic income pilot program, Canadians find themselves engaged in a policy question we haven’t grappled with in almost half a century: how should the welfare state evolve? 

Pages