Inequality and poverty

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This paper examines 15 years of income inequality for families raising children in Ontario (2000 to 2015), comparing it with national data for context, and finds several disturbing trends.
TORONTO – Ontario is becoming more polarized as the bottom half of Ontario families see their share of the income pie shrinking while the top half takes home even more, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The bottom half of families raising children in Ontario saw its share of earnings fall to 19 per cent of total labour market income between 2000 and 2015—down three percentage points—while the top half of families increased its share of the income pie by three percentage points, earning 81 per cent of the total income pie.
The Ontario government has committed to raise its minimum wage to $14 on January 1, 2018 then to $15 on January 1, 2019. This paper examines who in the province will get a "raise" from the $15 minimum wage, and finds it will largely benefit the province’s most marginalized—a broad and diverse swath of workers including contract, seasonal, and casual workers, part-time workers, women, and immigrants.
The Ontario government has committed to raise its minimum wage to $15 on January 1, 2019. But who in the province will benefit most from the increase? Like and share the image below, and read our report to find out more about which Ontarians will get a raise: Ontario Needs A Raise: Who Benefits From a $15 Minimum Wage.
OTTAWA—Ontario’s commitment to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour has more to do with raising earnings for the province’s most marginalized than the move’s potential impacts on teenaged workers or small mom-and-pop shops. 
Photo by r2hox (Flickr creative commons)
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This article is available in plain language here. Plain language is a style of writing preferred by many people with intellectual disabilities.

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