Energy policy

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This study re-examines Canada’s contribution to global climate change in light of the Paris Agreement by looking at extracted carbon—the total amount of fossil fuels removed from Canadian soil that ends up in the atmosphere—whether used for domestic purposes or exported and combusted elsewhere.
Our latest study shows a dramatic rise in Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel extraction. In 2015 (the most recent year there was data available) Canada’s extraction activities yielded almost 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide.
OTTAWA—The amount of fossil fuel removed from Canadian soil that ends up in the atmosphere as harmful carbon dioxide has risen dramatically, almost exclusively because of our country’s growing fossil fuel exports, finds a new Corporate Mapping Project study published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and the Parkland Institute. Extracted carbon from Canada (fossil fuels extracted and used domestically or exported and combusted elsewhere) increased 26 per cent from 2000 to 2014. In 2015, Canada’s extracted carbon equalled almost 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide.
Looking for BC Update and BC Commentary? Look no further. We’ve combined the two to create BC Solutions. Through this new publication, we’re pleased to be better able to keep you up-to-date on research, events and other goings-on at the CCPA–BC Office. In this issue:
Vancouver – Today’s federal government decision to approve the Kinder Morgan TransMountain pipeline expansion while not unexpected is extremely short-sighted, says the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office. “By approving the Kinder Morgan pipeline, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has disappointed a generation and betrayed the rights and title of Indigenous people,” said Shannon Daub, Associate Director of the CCPA-BC Office and co-Director of the Corporate Mapping Project.
TORONTO – A proposal to partially sell off a long held public asset, Toronto Hydro, could turn the private sector’s gain into Toronto consumers’ pain, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Ontario office (CCPA-Ontario). Selling off part of Toronto Hydro would result in the City of Toronto ceding the control it now has over electricity prices, hydro service reliability, and environmental stewardship in the face of catastrophic climate change.

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